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16

Apr

foxadhd:

We love you, Blood Moon

foxadhd:

We love you, Blood Moon

vmagazine:

The Criterion Collection and Hulu have extended their deal to keep the video platform as the exclusive streaming home of Criterion’s vast library of art house films.  Hulu Plus houses more than 800 movies in Criterion’s singular collection.  Criterion is known for its lavish DVD and Blu-ray packages, many of which feature restorations of older films.

The most recent streaming addition is the Italian film by Paolo Sorrentino ‘The Great Beauty' (La Grande Bellezza 2013), synonymous to the works of Federico Fellini, Roberto Rossellini and other Italian classics.  The film won Best Foreign Language Film at the 86th Academy Awards, the Golden Globes and the BAFTA (British Academy of Film and Television Arts).

"For real cinephiles who want to dig in and see lots of different kinds of films, I don’t think there’s ever been a better time." said Peter Becker, president of the Criterion Collection.  - AP (New York)

The 50 Best Criterion Collection Releases

  1. CLOSE UP by Abbas Kiarostami (1990)
  2. MISHIMA: A LIFE IN FOUR CHAPTERS by Paul Schrader (1985)
  3. THE RED SHOES by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (1948)
  4. LA JETEE / SANS SOLEIL by Chris Marker (1963 / 1983)
  5. TOKYO STORY by Yasujiro Ozu (1953)
  6. THE LIFE AND DEATH OF COLONEL BLIMP by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (1943)
  7. THE RULES OF THE GAME by Jean Renoir (1939)
  8. IKIRU by Akira Kurosawa (1952)
  9. MODERN TIMES by Charlie Chaplin (1935)
  10. JULES AND JIM by Francois Truffaut (1962)
  11. F FOR FAKE by Orson Welles (1975)
  12. BREATHLESS by Jean-Luc Godard (1960)
  13. PLAYTIME by Jacques Tati (1967)
  14. JEANNE DIELMAN, 23, QUAI DU COMMERCE, 1080 BRUXELLES by Chantal Akerman (1975)
  15. SEVEN SAMURAI by Akira Kurosawa (1954)
  16. FANNY AND ALEXANDER by Ingmar Bergman (1982)
  17. JOHN CASSAVETES: FIVE FILMS by John Cassavetes (1959 - 1977)
  18. THE ADVENTURES OF ANTOINE DOINEL by Francois Truffaut (1959 - 1979)
  19. SALO, OR THE 120 DAYS OF SODOM by Pier Paolo Pasolini (1975)
  20. AU HASARD BALTHAZAR by Robert Bresson (1966)
  21. YI YI by Edward Yang (2001)
  22. ARMY OF SHADOWS by Jean-Pierre Melville (1969)
  23. THREE COLORS by Krzysztof Kieslowski (1993 - 1994)
  24. IN THE REALM OF THE SENSES by Nagisa Oshima (1976)
  25. L’AVVENTURA by Michelangelo Antonioni (1960)
  26. Complete list with synopsis via Film.com

***FlickChart compiled an extensive list of the best 100 Criterion Collection films on streaming Hulu

(Source: relationshipquote)

nprfreshair:

Fresh Air’s TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new series  Fargo, based on the 1996 Coen Brothers cult classic. Here’s what he says: 



When the news arrives that FX has a new series called Fargo, the expectation is that it will be either a sequel to, or expansion of, that 18-year-old movie. And certainly, the previews have done nothing to discourage that.

But no. The TV version of Fargo tells a completely different story, with completely different characters. Only the snow remains the same. Yet based on the first four episodes, this new Fargo is a worthy companion piece to the film. The Coen brothers are on board as two of the executive producers, so they clearly approve – though that’s pretty much the extent of their involvement. Instead, FX’s Fargo is written and concocted by Noah Hawley, whose previous credits include working on Bones, and not much else. This is his step up to the major leagues – and in his first at-bat in the bigs, he swings hard, and hits a home run.

His Fargo – this first season, anyway – is envisioned as a stand-alone 10-part story. If it continues to a Season 2, it will be with a completely different plot, characters, and cast. That’s the way True Detective launched itself this season on HBO, and you know how brilliantly that turned out. By designing TV shows this way – longer and deeper than a feature film but not running for years – networks can get A-list movie talent to commit, and writers can craft stories with the end in sight from the start.
FX’s Fargo benefits from that, greatly.

Hear the full review HERE. 



 

image via FX 

nprfreshair:

Fresh Air’s TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new series  Fargo, based on the 1996 Coen Brothers cult classic. Here’s what he says: 

When the news arrives that FX has a new series called Fargo, the expectation is that it will be either a sequel to, or expansion of, that 18-year-old movie. And certainly, the previews have done nothing to discourage that.

But no. The TV version of Fargo tells a completely different story, with completely different characters. Only the snow remains the same. Yet based on the first four episodes, this new Fargo is a worthy companion piece to the film. The Coen brothers are on board as two of the executive producers, so they clearly approve – though that’s pretty much the extent of their involvement. Instead, FX’s Fargo is written and concocted by Noah Hawley, whose previous credits include working on Bones, and not much else. This is his step up to the major leagues – and in his first at-bat in the bigs, he swings hard, and hits a home run.

His Fargo – this first season, anyway – is envisioned as a stand-alone 10-part story. If it continues to a Season 2, it will be with a completely different plot, characters, and cast. That’s the way True Detective launched itself this season on HBO, and you know how brilliantly that turned out. By designing TV shows this way – longer and deeper than a feature film but not running for years – networks can get A-list movie talent to commit, and writers can craft stories with the end in sight from the start.

FX’s Fargo benefits from that, greatly.

Hear the full review HERE.

 

image via FX 

Das a mafucka in this mafucka getting dough Like a mafucka in this mafucka whatchu know

"She was the Picasso of passive aggressive karate. She was better than any con artist I ever met including myself and she had me like nobody had me. You might say she was my Karma for how I took advantage of people.”

Going to kill myself bye

(Source: supermodelgif)

sexhaver:

two sick horses evaluating an orb

sexhaver:

two sick horses evaluating an orb

(Source: alessandromancodogphotographer)

It’s a metaphor.
Sylvia Plath (via incorrectsylviaplathquotes)

15

Apr

And I ammmm…NOT a father! Woo!

Joe

Joe

(Source: medusajellyfish)

thornicating:

snap snap snap snap 
                     snap 
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            snap
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snap snap snap snap

movieposteroftheday:

Official poster for the 2014 Cannes Film Festival
Designers: Herve Chigioni and Gilles Frappier
Poster source: IMPAwards

movieposteroftheday:

Official poster for the 2014 Cannes Film Festival

Designers: Herve Chigioni and Gilles Frappier

Poster source: IMPAwards

(Source: m0od)